Originally published at The Literary Nurse.

Today I took my final exam for Professional Nursing: Concepts & Issues, the one class I was taking over the summer semester as it was the only pre-requisite class I needed for the FIU Nursing program. Last week my group did an in-class presentation on NICU Nursing for which we all got a 95/100. I don’t know what grade I got on my final yet, but short of getting an F on it (which I won’t), I’ll still get an A in the class. So, I’m calling it:

  • Professional Nursing: Concepts & Issues – A

Today also marks my last day as an FIU student for the time being. As I’ve said before, this actually makes me sad; I really like FIU, even with all its quirks, so I will miss not being a student there. After class I chatted with a couple of my fellow classmates, one of them who was accepted into the BSN program, two who weren’t, and we blew some steam. Heck, even the guy who got in (he has a 4.0 GPA) was venting. We’ve learned a few things here and there about some of the people accepted that left us scratching our heads or downright calling foul. I won’t go into any of it, though, because it serves no purpose now after the steam was vented off.

The other day I found another one of my classmates on Facebook and saw that he also had not been accepted. We expressed mutual sympathy and exchanged good wishes. When he asked, and I told him, why I had not been accepted, that it had all been due to a GPA failing, he said the following:

…selection process at fiu is kinda wack imo. Just cause you are a book worm does not mean you will function well. Like lets be real here dude. You would be doing all the hands on shit in anatomy, digesting and understanding while most just stood around grossed that you were holding an arm.[sic]

Momentary ego-boost aside (I won’t lie), that right there made me feel really good. Professors deal with hundreds and hundreds of students. While they may learn your name during class, there’s little guarantee that will last once you’ve moved on in most cases. Getting noticed by a professor who is also dealing with 119 other students is next to impossible. Getting noticed by your peers, that’s what counts. The above is not the first thing to that effect I’ve been told. I always dismiss it with an awkward smile but to be recognized by those who are going through the paces with you, that’s what counts. That my peers noticed what I was doing, how I was doing it, why I was doing it, and that I did it well, regardless of the grade on the exam, that is gold to a student. It means I’m on the right path.

Let’s face it, this was my admission slot to lose, and I lost it. I did. Me. I accept that. I own that. I make my peace with that.

Now it’s time to move on. There’s no Plan B. There’s Plan A waiting to be implemented. Let’s do this.

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